Weret-hekau

Weret Hekau Weret Hekau

Weret-hekau (Urthekau) was a lion headed goddess who was also depicted as a snake with the head of a woman. She was the wife of Re-Horakhty and wore his symbol (the sun disc) on her head along with a cobra on her brow. She protected the sun god and acted as a wet nurse for the pharaohs. The pharaoh in part derived his right to rule from his mother, who would normally be the previous king´s Great Wife. As a result it was sometimes suggested that the queen became the goddess when she bore the next pharaoh. This myth was referred to by Hatshepsut, a female Pharaoh, to help support the legitimacy of her rule.

Her name means "great magician" and she was known as "She Who is Rich in Magic Spells" prompting some to suggest that she was not actually a distinct goddess, but a form of Isis. As she took either the form of a lion or a snake and protected the sun god, she is also associated with Wadjet and Sekhmet and the story of the "eye of Ra".

Because she was a powerful symbol of protection, her name along with the symbol of a snake often appears on magical weapons buried with the dead to help them protect themselves in the underworld. Her name also appears on ivory knives which were supposed to protect pregnant and nursing women.

copyright J Hill 2010
Return to Top


Ancient Egypt Online

Predynastic period Early Dynastic Old Kingdom First Intermediate Middle Kingdom Second Intermediate New Kingdom Third Intermediate Graeco-Roman period Late period